8 Myth And Realities About Milk Teeth

Myth And Realities About Milk Teeth

Are you confused between the myth and the realities about milk teeth?

When your baby is teething, it is a very critical time for your baby. Your baby needs a lot of care, but it is a must for parents to get the best information. Many parents are very confused, and they think about what to do when their baby starts teething. They are also confused between the myth and realities about milk teeth. Don’t worry here; you will read what are the myths and what are the realities about milk teeth.

Here are 8 myths and realities about milk teeth:

  • Myth: Milk teeth appear in at six months.

Fact: Milk teeth can appear early in three months and late in fourteen months. A child’s twenty milk teeth start to develop within the sixth and eighth week before birth and already present in the jaw at birth. The set of twenty teeth appear entirely at three years of age.

  • Myth: Milk teeth aren’t important.

Fact: Permanent teeth finally replace your child’s milk teeth. Milk teeth are essential because they keep the place until the permanent teeth develop in place. Your child’s milk teeth can’t lose until they’re between the ages of ten to twelve years old. So milk teeth are important as permanent teeth. Because milk teeth help to chew and talk.

  • Myth: It will be apparent when a baby is teething.

Fact: The process of teething is different in all kids. Some kids show the signs of teething and some not. But some signs are common when a baby is teething.

Babywise author Linda Scruggs writes the most common teething signs:

  1. Refusing feedings
  2. More irritation and crying
  3. More drooling
  4. Sleep disturbances
  • Myth: Teething can cause your baby ill.

Fact: As we mostly hear that teething causes fever, diarrhea, and many other problems. New research reveals that teething signs are not severe. These are some common teething signs gum irritation, annoyance, and drooling.

A recent study in Pediatrics reveals; some babies feel a minor increase in temperature. Jade Miller, D.D.S president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD)says, fever 00.4°F or higher is not the sign of teething.

  • Myth: You can’t help your baby with teething discomfort.

Fact: Linda suggests some tips for comforting a teething baby:

  1. Rub your baby’s gums smoothly for 1 to 2 minutes with a clean finger.
  2. Give secure teething tools to your baby.
  3. Give baby a cold, clean cloth.
  4. If you want to give baby pain reliever, discuss with a doctor before.
  5. Your baby will feel discomfort for some days.
  6. Give attention to your baby’s intuition.
  • Myth: Don’t brush or floss your baby’s teeth.

Fact: Brush your kid’s teeth, whether milk teeth or permanent teeth. Brush your kid’s teeth two times a day for two minutes. Sugars and carbohydrates from food and drinks mixed with the saliva and creates a gluey layer on your teeth, which is called dental plaque.

The plaque includes dangerous bacteria that can damage tooth enamel. Flossing helps to remove plaque and bacteria. It helps to remove bacteria and plaque from the areas where your toothbrush can’t touch. Also, don’t forget to prepare your child for a trip to the orthodontist.

  • Myth: Don’t brush your kid’s teeth with a fluoride toothpaste until two years of age.

Fact: Experts recommend using fluoride toothpaste is best for kids. Dr. Miller says, fluoride fights with harmful bacteria and reduces the risk of decay.

Just use a tiny amount of fluoride toothpaste for your kids.  Much use of fluoride toothpaste can affect your kid’s teeth, such as rough teeth and white spots on teeth. Many kids don’t spit it out and swallow toothpaste.

Parents mostly used a baby label toothpaste for their kids. Dr. Amini says if a baby-labeled toothpaste doesn’t contain fluoride, then it is not best for your kids because it is not a cavity-prevention toothpaste.

  • Myth: Don’t take your kids to the dentist until they start school.

Fact: This myth is not valid. It is must to take your kids to the dentist before starting school. Many schools recommend and need that your child has teeth checked by a dentist before starting school.

Many school administrators think that if a child can agree and sit for a dental checkup, they’ll be ready to perform well in a classroom.

Summary

Milk teeth appear in at six months. Milk teeth can appear early in three months and late in fourteen months. Milk teeth aren’t important. So milk teeth are important as permanent teeth.

The process of teething is different in all kids. Teething can cause your baby ill.

New research reveals that teething signs are not severe. You can’t help your baby with teething discomfort. Linda suggests some tips for comforting a teething baby. Brush your kid’s teeth two times a day for two minutes.

In The End

Hope you get a lot of info and enjoy to read this article. Here you read the myths and Realities about milk teeth. Share this informative articles with other parents who are confused about what to do when their baby starts teething. Also, share your knowledge with us and comment.

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